Aullwood’s January schedule of events


Staff Report



<strong>The Aullwood Nature Center blanketed in snow.</strong>

The Aullwood Nature Center blanketed in snow.


Contributed photos

Hike the Wrights Trail to experience the beautiful winter landscape, birds and other exciting discoveries. Meet in the lobby of the Nature Center for the start of morning discovery walks.


Contributed photos

Sunday, January 14 from 2:30 p.m. – 4 p.m.is Aullwood’s first program in its Winter Speaker Series “Women in Science” 2018 - “Hey, Robyn, What’s This?” - presented by Robyn Wright-Strauss, Chief Naturalist, Edge of Appalachia


Contributed photos

Marne Titchenell, Program Specialist, The Ohio State University Extension School of Environment and Natural Resources


Contributed photos

Emma “Grandma” Gatewood became the first woman to solo hike the entire 2,168 miles of the Appalachian Trail end to end, at the age of 67.


Contributed photos

BUTLER TWP. — Warm up with a January visit to Aullwood and take a hike on the frosty trails! Enjoy the 2018 Winter Speaker Series “Women in Science” on Sunday afternoons at 2:30 p.m. Join the weekly Morning Discovery Walks for Adults on Thursdays starting at 8 a.m. or visit the Farm for the Bird Prints in the Snow Farm Walk.

Morning Discovery Walks for Adults

Thursdays, January 11, 18 and 25 from 8 to 9:30 a.m. Join Sam Romeo, Aullwood Environmental Educator, on this fun walk to experience the beautiful winter landscape, birds and other exciting discoveries. Meet in the lobby of the Nature Center for the start of morning discovery walks. Bring binoculars. Members of Aullwood and National Audubon Society are admitted free, non-members are $7/adult. (Center)

Project FeederWatch

Thursdays and Fridays, January 11, 12, 25 and 26 from 9:30 – 11:30 a.m. Count birds, drink coffee, eat donuts, share stories, and count more birds. These bird counts contribute to scientific studies at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology. Visit the Cornell web site at www.bird.cornell.edu/pfw for more information. (Center)

Aullwood Winter Speaker Series

Sunday, January 14 from 2:30 p.m. – 4 p.m.is Aullwood’s first program in its Winter Speaker Series “Women in Science” 2018 – “Hey, Robyn, What’s This?” – presented by Robyn Wright-Strauss, Chief Naturalist, Edge of Appalachia. Robyn Wright-Strauss joined the staff of the Edge of Appalachia in September 2014 and is in charge of Environmental Education Programs and Summer Science Camps. Her work with the EE program reaches third to seventh graders in Adams County through field classes conducted on the preserve and through in-class presentations. She will be presenting on her work with children and the incredibly interesting and sometimes unusual plants, animals and insects they find on the preserve. The Richard and Lucile Durrell Edge of Appalachia Preserve is one of the most biologically diverse collections of natural systems in the Midwestern U.S., encompassing rugged woodland, prairie openings, waterfalls, giant promontories and clear streams. More than 100 rare plant and animal species make their home within the preserve system. (Center)

Sunday, January 21 from 2:30 – 4 p.m.is Aullwood’s second program in the Winter Speaker Series “Women in Science” 2018 – “Ohio Bats and White-nose Syndrome” – presented by Marne Titchenell, Program Specialist, The Ohio State University Extension School of Environment and Natural Resources. Marne is involved in the Ohio Bat Working Group which focuses on facilitating communication, information sharing, and collaboration between researchers, land managers, agency personnel, rehabilitators, and others with a professional interest in bats throughout Ohio. She will be presenting on the current state of bats in Ohio and White-Nose Syndrome which has caused a high mortality rate in bats in the northeastern part of the United States. She has worked as a Program Specialist with OSU since 2007.

Marne holds a BS and MS in natural resources from The Ohio State University’s School of Environment and Natural Resources. With both degrees she chose to specialize in wildlife and forestry. As a master’s student, she studied the response of bat populations in southern Ohio to shelterwood harvests in oak-hickory forests. She works to provide a variety of educational programs, workshops, conferences, and publications centered on wildlife ecology and biology, habitat management for wildlife, and managing nuisance wildlife species. (Center)

Bird Prints in the Snow – Farm Walk

Saturday, January 20 starting at 2:30 p.m. Brrrrr, it’s cold outside! Help feed the birds at the farm during these cold winter months. Make several different types of simple bird feeders and leave your mark at Aullwood. Hang one of your bird feeders outside and watch the birds consume their edible treat. Take your other bird feeder home and enjoy watching birds from the warmth of your kitchen. After being outside, enjoy some hot chocolate and cookies. Bundle up before you come to visit! (Farm)

*Paint Like Audubon

Saturday, January 27 from 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. is the Center for Lifelong Learning Paint Like Audubon Workshop led by Aullwood’s own Chris Rowlands. Join this class to learn about how John James Audubon painted birds. You will also learn the story behind his way of painting and test it out for yourself. You will create your own masterpiece using the technique Audubon mastered. Chris Rowlands is a member of Masterworks for Nature, which is a group of Southwestern Ohio regional artists dedicated to raising awareness and funds for conservation. He has been painting for over 40 years and brings his humor as well as his love for art to the workshop. Bring your own watercolor paint and brushes. Other materials will be supplied. There will be a break for lunch; please pack a lunch to eat onsite. (Center)

Price: $30 Member FoA, $35 Non-member. Class limit: 15 (5 minimum) – Level: Beginner.

Aullwood Winter Speaker Series

Sunday, January 28 from 2:30 p.m. – 4 p.m.is Aullwood’s third program in the Winter Speaker Series “Women in Science” 2018 – “Grandma Gatewood’s Walk” – presented by Sam Romeo, Aullwood Environmental Educator.

This is a story of Emma “Grandma” Gatewood, which speaks to the courageous spirit of not only the people of Appalachia but also nature enthusiasts everywhere. Emma Caldwell, born in 1887 at Raccoon Creek in Gallia County, Ohio, was 1 of 15 children. After raising 11 children of her own, Emma decided she needed another challenge in her life. When she read about the Appalachian Trail in National Geographic she discovered that no women had ever hiked the trail from one end to the other. It sounded like a challenge to her and she decided to be that woman. Never mind that she was 66 years old, had no real equipment, and had no real experience in backcountry hiking.

Grandma Gatewood set off on the barely marked trail from Mount Katahdin, Maine. She didn’t make it the first time and she underestimated just how difficult and long the Appalachian Trail was. However, she set off again the following year in 1955 with an “aluminum blanket,” old army blanket, Keds sneakers, extra dress, hose, house slippers, and a canteen. This time she managed to become the first women to hike the entire 2,168 miles of the Appalachian Trail. Emma became known to the public as Grandma Gatewood and a celebrity across America. Being the first woman to solo hike the Appalachian Trail end to end, at the age of 67, was no small feat. Her story raised the veil on several cultural barriers of the day, including age and sex discrimination. Local reporters followed her story, Sports Illustrated featured her, even the Keds sneaker company latched onto the marketing opportunity and supplied her with shoes. After completing the hike she was featured on “The Today Show,” “Groucho Marx,” “You Bet Your Life” and “The Tonight Show.” (Center)

General admission is $7/adult and $5/child unless otherwise noted with an asterisk (*). Members of Friends of Aullwood and National Audubon Society are admitted free. Aullwood Center programs are held at 1000 Aullwood Road. Aullwood Farm programs are held at 9101 Frederick Pike. Call (937) 890-7360 for more information. Read more on our website www.aullwood.org.

The Aullwood Nature Center blanketed in snow.
https://www.englewoodindependent.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/26/2018/01/web1_AullwoodNatureCenterinSnow.jpgThe Aullwood Nature Center blanketed in snow. Contributed photos

Hike the Wrights Trail to experience the beautiful winter landscape, birds and other exciting discoveries. Meet in the lobby of the Nature Center for the start of morning discovery walks.
https://www.englewoodindependent.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/26/2018/01/web1_WrightsTrail.jpgHike the Wrights Trail to experience the beautiful winter landscape, birds and other exciting discoveries. Meet in the lobby of the Nature Center for the start of morning discovery walks. Contributed photos

Sunday, January 14 from 2:30 p.m. – 4 p.m.is Aullwood’s first program in its Winter Speaker Series “Women in Science” 2018 – “Hey, Robyn, What’s This?”presented by Robyn Wright-Strauss, Chief Naturalist, Edge of Appalachia
https://www.englewoodindependent.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/26/2018/01/web1_RobynWright-Strauss.jpgSunday, January 14 from 2:30 p.m. – 4 p.m.is Aullwood’s first program in its Winter Speaker Series “Women in Science” 2018 – “Hey, Robyn, What’s This?”presented by Robyn Wright-Strauss, Chief Naturalist, Edge of Appalachia Contributed photos

Marne Titchenell, Program Specialist, The Ohio State University Extension School of Environment and Natural Resources
https://www.englewoodindependent.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/26/2018/01/web1_MarneTitchenell.jpgMarne Titchenell, Program Specialist, The Ohio State University Extension School of Environment and Natural Resources Contributed photos

Emma “Grandma” Gatewood became the first woman to solo hike the entire 2,168 miles of the Appalachian Trail end to end, at the age of 67.
https://www.englewoodindependent.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/26/2018/01/web1_GrandmaGatewood.jpgEmma “Grandma” Gatewood became the first woman to solo hike the entire 2,168 miles of the Appalachian Trail end to end, at the age of 67. Contributed photos

Staff Report