Native Perennial Flower Sale is June 19


Staff Report



<strong>A Zebra Swallowtail butterfly on a Purple Coneflower at the Montgomery SWCD office.</strong>

A Zebra Swallowtail butterfly on a Purple Coneflower at the Montgomery SWCD office.


Contributed photo

BROOKVILLE — The Montgomery Soil & Water Conservation District (SWCD) is once again having its annual Native Perennial Flower Sale on Tuesday, June 19 from 8:30 a.m. until 4 p.m. at its office at 10025 Amity Rd., Brookville.

The sale will be first come, first served, and by donation only. Cash or check only, please.

The native landscaping areas around the office building and grounds are intended as demonstration gardens, allowing you to become familiar with the native plants that can beautify your home landscaping. Each year, they take the surplus plants that come up as ‘volunteers’ and transplant them into pots to share them with you. The sale is first come, first served, and by donation only. Availability is determined by what grows and gets transplanted.

If you want the best ‘bang for your buck’ in your landscaping for pollinators, birds, butterflies and other wildlife, native plants are what you need. This sale is a great way to get a variety of native plants that thrive in this region. Although natives have many benefits, it can take some persistence to find them, since many retailers offer a very limited selection, if any, of natives. The Montgomery SWCD is excited to be able to offer a limited quantity of a variety of native perennials in their donation-only, one day ‘sale.’

A simple way to define native plants is the plants that occur naturally in an area without having been put there by human involvement. They are beneficial in a variety of wonderful ways. They generally have deep root systems, making more efficient use of the water and nutrients in the soil. This means they don’t need to be fertilized or watered, even in a drought, once established. Many species of pollinators, including native bees, butterflies, dragonflies, hummingbirds and other birds need specific native plants to survive. They may be able to eat (or drink nectar) from a variety of plants, but in order to raise their young, often only certain plants will do. Many butterflies will only lay their eggs on a few species of native plants. By having native plants, you are preserving the natural heritage of our region. And, not to be overlooked is their beauty.

By having native plants in your landscaping, you are also avoiding a group of plants known as invasive plants. These are plants that are from other parts of the country or world, but do too well in their ‘new’ home. Plants are invasive if they crowd out the native vegetation. Invasive plants cause both environmental and economic harm. Invasive plants are still invasive even when contained in a garden or mowed around, because they produce seeds or berries that are then carried by the birds or the wind to other areas.

If you’d like to help with transplanting and/or the sale, or if you have questions, call or email Kristen Lauer, Education/Information Specialist, at LauerK@mcohio.org or (937) 854-7646 ext. 0521. Don’t miss this inexpensive way to add beautiful flowers to your landscape.

A Zebra Swallowtail butterfly on a Purple Coneflower at the Montgomery SWCD office.
https://www.englewoodindependent.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/26/2018/06/web1_Butterfly.jpgA Zebra Swallowtail butterfly on a Purple Coneflower at the Montgomery SWCD office. Contributed photo

Staff Report