Clayton to purchase police vehicles


By Ron Nunnari - Rnunnari@civitasmedia.com



Clayton Police Chief Matt Hamlin standing beside one of the department’s Ford Police Interceptor Utility models, which is built for full pursuit applications. It is the first-ever Ford pursuit-rated utility model available for police work.


Photo by Ron Nunnari

CLAYTON — A resolution authorizing the purchase of two police vehicles was passed by Clayton Council at its March 3 meeting. The purchase would be made utilizing the state bid at a total cost not to exceed $52,722.

City Manager Rick Rose is authorized to purchase two 2016/2017 Ford Interceptors for use by the police department from Statewide Ford Lincoln Mercury.

“This is our ongoing fleet replacement,” said Police Chief Matt Hamlin. “We will be replacing our last old Crown Vic and one of the newer, old sedan/interceptors that we bought back in 2012-2013. The Crown Vic has about 120,000 miles on it and the sedan is upwards of 85,000. These vehicle purchases are budgeted for 2016 budget and are on the state bid at $52,722, a slight increase of about $200 per car.”

Each vehicle would cost approximately $26,000 each. The city might keep the Crown Victoria is another use for it can be found for city staff. If the city decides to sell the car it would be sold via the GovDeals website. If not the city has the option to sell it at the Dayton Auto Auction to the highest bidder. Sometimes the city will put a ‘minimum low bid’ reserve on a vehicle. If the minimum is not met the city keeps the vehicle depending on its condition.

Councilman Mike Stevens stated that the $26,000 purchase price is a great deal but also noted that there is ‘a ton of equipment’ that has to be installed on the vehicles after being purchased.

“My question is, roughly what does it cost to outfit a vehicle?” Stevens asked.

To outfit a new car would cost approximately $15,000 according to Hamlin.

“The reason why is that the old Crown Victorias are no longer being built by Ford so we didn’t have any choice to select another vehicle,” Hamlin noted. “We went with the Ford SUVs because they closely match the dimensions of the Crown Vic, but you can’t take the equipment out of the Crown Vic and put it right into the SUVs.”

Hamlin said the department buys all new equipment for the SUVs. After this year the police department will have a fleet of SUVs. Next year when vehicle purchases are made all of the current equipment would be transferred to the new vehicles, which will save the city money.

In-car cameras and radar units need to be replaced every three to five years, which would be the only additional cost. All of the other equipment could be transferred from older vehicles into the new ones.

Stevens asked why the city doesn’t bid to have the vehicles come fully equipped with all of the necessary hardware. Hamlin explained that it would dramatically increase the cost.

Clayton Police Chief Matt Hamlin standing beside one of the department’s Ford Police Interceptor Utility models, which is built for full pursuit applications. It is the first-ever Ford pursuit-rated utility model available for police work.
http://aimmedianetwork.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/26/2016/03/web1_ClaytonCruiserSUV.jpgClayton Police Chief Matt Hamlin standing beside one of the department’s Ford Police Interceptor Utility models, which is built for full pursuit applications. It is the first-ever Ford pursuit-rated utility model available for police work. Photo by Ron Nunnari

By Ron Nunnari

Rnunnari@civitasmedia.com

Reach Ron Nunnari at 684-9124, via email Rnunnari@civitasmedia.com or on Twitter @Englewood_Ind

Reach Ron Nunnari at 684-9124, via email Rnunnari@civitasmedia.com or on Twitter @Englewood_Ind